Famous fakes

A book about Tuduc fakes edited and written by Stefano Ionescu has just been published. The book is entitled “Handbook of Fakes by Tuduc” and includes 76 images of Tuduc fakes and images of authentic examples used as models for Tuduc.

A Tuduc fake: The McMullan Armorial Lotto, Metropolitian Museum of Art

Stefano Ionescu’s handbook presents a framework for identifying suspect carpets which involves examination of technical and stylistic characteristics of Tuduc’s workmanship.

“Alberto Boralvi has kindly contributed biographical notes and a portrait of Teodor Tuduc and also provided valuable information about fakes” says Stefano Ionescu to Jozan Magazine.

Theodor Tudoc was a Romanian master weaver which forgeries and “reproductions” of Anatolian, Caucasian and Persian carpets from the 15th 16th and 17th centuries, fooled many museums and famous collectors and scholars as J.F. Ballard, M.S. Dimand, Kurt Erdmann, Joseph V. McMullan, Ulrich Schürmann and many others.

European and American collections harboring these fakes include the National Museum of Art, Bucharest; the Brukenthal Museum, Sibiu; the Art Museum, Brasov; the Museum for Islamic Art, Berlin; the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Textile Museum of Canada, Toronto; The Nickle Arts Museum of Calgary, and others still undiscovered.

“The book was presented during the recent talk tour in the US involving major museums, rug societies and collectors, from coast to coast” says Stefano Ionescu.

A Tuduc fake examined by Bob Mann, Paul Ramsey and Stefano Ionescu

This tour was organized by ACOR and included talks about Ottoman rugs in Transylvania, Romanian kilims and Tuduc fakes in Philadelphia, Washington DC, New York, Boston, Chicago, Denver, Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles.